The setting ranges of the time relays are explained in detail

Time delay
Time delay relays are used in control-switching operations involving a time delay. Most of these time relays have multiple setting ranges and are explained below.
Definition of the deadline
Timed relays carry out the activation or deactivation delay. An arrow is used to indicate the timer function. An arrow pointing up indicates a timing action with activation delay, while an arrow pointing down indicates a timing action without delay

Both delayed and delayed timers can turn their loads on or off, depending on how the timer output is wired into the circuit. The term “switch-on delay” indicates that a preset time must elapse after the timer receives a signal to be activated before the timer contacts change.
The term “off delay” indicates that a preset time must elapse after the timer receives a deactivation signal before the timer contacts change state.

Self-timer closed timer timed
The following illustration shows an example of a Delayed Close Timer, also referred to as a Normally Closed Timer NOT C ) Timer. In this example, the time delay relay ( TR1 ) has been set for a 5-second time delay.

When S1 is closed, timer TR1 starts timing. After 5 seconds, TR1 the contacts close and the pilot light PL1 lights up. When S1 opens, timer TR1 deactivates, and the TR1 contacts open immediately, extinguishing pilot PL1.

Self-timer, open timer timed
The following illustration shows an example of a programmed opening timer, also known as a programmed opening normally closed ( NCTO ) timer. The timing relay ( TR1 ) has been set for a 5-second delay.

When S1 closes, timer TR1 energizes. After 5 seconds, the TR1 contacts open and the PL1 pilot light goes out. When S1 opens, timer TR1 deactivates, and TR1, the contacts close immediately, lighting the pilot light PL1.

setting ranges of the time relays
setting ranges of the time relays

Out of time, timed opening
The following illustrations show an example of a programmed opening timer, also called a normally programmed opening delay (normally NOTO ) timer. The timing relay ( TR1 ) has been set for a 5-second switch-off delay.
When S1 closes, opens TR1 the contacts open immediately and the pilot light PL1 lights up.

When S1 opens, timer TR1 starts timing. After 5 seconds, TR1 TR1 contacts open and pilot light PL1 off.

Out of time, closed on time
The illustration below shows an example of a delayed close timer, also referred to as a normally closed timer ( NCTC ) timer. The timing relay ( TR1 ) has been set for 5 seconds.
When S1 closes, TR1 the contacts open immediately and the pilot light PL1 turns off.

When S1 opens, timer TR1 starts timing. After 5 seconds, timer TR1 the contacts close and the pilot light PL1 lights up.

Instant contacts
Time delay relays can also have instantaneous normally open or normally closed contacts. In the following example, when switching S1 closes, TR1 the instantaneous contacts close immediately and the pilot light PL1 lights up.
After a predefined delay, TR1 the synchronization contacts close and the night light PL2 lights up.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *